Truth. It’s More Important Than Ever.

The NY Times published a short piece covering a protest against banning some news outlets from a briefing by the White House Press Secretary last Friday. In my opinion, the protest was well warranted and worth covering. Others will be more eloquent and lengthy in their affirmations of the importance of a free press. I support them and think we need to deal with the real threat that exists at this moment. Having said that, the article covering the protest disturbed me because it revealed, probably inadvertently, one of our country’s current major problems – not limited to the press and media.

The article began:

On Sunday morning, the time when many engage in the weekend ritual of reading the news over coffee, a large crowd converged outside The New York Times’s Manhattan headquarters on Eighth Avenue to defend the country’s press. “It’s a New York Sunday tradition,” read a sign held by Norman Cohen, a freelance TV producer, “Coffee, Bagels, and a FREE PRESS.”

The article ended:

As the protest concluded, some people waved Sunday’s edition of The Times, folded to reveal a full-page advertisement from the newspaper. It read: “Truth. It’s more important now than ever.”

There is another Sunday ritual that New Yorker’s engage in: Sunday Church services. On Sunday, many New Yorkers were at Church rather than “reading the news over coffee.” Was this Sunday reality overlooked because many church-goers were in the less fashionable neighborhoods of the Bronx, Queens and Brooklyn and in languages other than English?

Full disclosure – I bought a bagel yesterday morning and had it with coffee and I went to Church. They are both good things – not quite of equal weight. If “truth is more important than ever,” then the media might want to get the story right. And that means providing readers and listeners with a fuller context and paying attention to what one fails to include in the story. So let me write a different lead sentence: “On Sunday morning, the time when many are at Church and others engage is the weekend ritual of reading the news….”   “Truth. It’s more important than ever.” The bubbles we live in create barriers that are hard to penetrate.  

2017 Oscars and Lent

Sr. Rose Pacatte

On this week’s episode of JustLove, Monsignor Kevin Sullivan will be focusing on the 2017 Oscars and Lent. This week’s guest is Sr. Rose Pacatte, FSP. She is Daughter of Saint Paul and Film Columnist at the National Catholic Reporter , as well as the Founding Director of the Pauline Center for Media Studies in Culver City, California. Sr. Rose and Msgr. Kevin Sullivan will be discussing the 2017 Oscars, and sharing their thoughts on some of the films that were nominated, as well as perhaps some films that were not nominated, but ought to have been. They will also share their predictions for 89th annual Academy Awards which airs on this Sunday night, February 26th.

If you want to learn more about the topics discussed on this week’s show, please visit the following links:

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Black History Month & NYC Fashion Week 2017

Jamila Codrington & Graham McAleer

This week on JustLove, Monsignor Kevin Sullivan will be speaking with two guests covering NYC Fashion Week 2017 and Black History Month. 

Graham McAleerProfessor of Philosophy at Loyola University in Maryland and author of  “Veneration and Refinement: The Ethics of Fashion” will be discussing with Msgr. Sullivan the fashion industry. They will be focusing on how an industry dedicated to beauty, celebrity, glamour and style squares up with the social teachings of the Church, and particularly the social teachings of both Pope Francis and Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI.

Dr. Jamila Codrington, PhD. a  Clinical Supervisor at Astor Services for Children and Families and an Adjunct Professor at New York Theological Seminary will be. Astor Services for Children and Families is an affiliate of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York. On the show Msgr. and Dr. Codrington will be discussing the impact that the experience of racism and oppression can have on the mental health of people of African descent. They’ll also focus on what are some culturally relevant strategies might be for coping with  individual, intergenerational and community trauma.

If you would like to learn more about the topics covered on this week’s show, please visit the following links:

 

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Theology by Beyonce: The 2017 Grammys Version – Did you miss it?

via GIPHY

  • – Thanksgiving to God for the gift of family and the people around us!  
  • – Voicing humanity’s bond to the cross of pain and loss – oft unspoken.
  • – Affirming, in every race, beauty, intelligence and capability! Dare we say? – The image of God that raises us above our discomfort and darkness.    
  • – A vision that blesses us with the hope to transcend our sufferings and mistakes toward a land, Dare we say? – A kingdom, of life, light and grace. Amen!

Read Bey’s full remarks…

“Thank you so much. Hi, baby.

Thank you to the Grammy voters for this incredible honor and, thank you to everyone who worked so hard to beautifully capture the profundity of deep southern culture.

… I thank God for my family, my wonderful husband, my beautiful daughter, my fans for bringing me so much happiness and support. We all experience pain and loss and often we become inaudible.

My intention for the film and album was to create a body of work that would give a voice to our pain, our struggles, our darkness and our history, to confront issues that make us uncomfortable.

It’s important to me to show images to my children that reflect their beauty so they can grow up in a world where they look in the mirror, first through their own families, as well as the news, the Super Bowl, the Olympics, the White House, and the Grammys, and see themselves. And have no doubt that they’re beautiful, intelligent, and capable.

This is something I want for every child of every race, and I feel it’s vital that we learn from the past and recognize our tendencies to repeat our mistakes….

Thank you, again, for honoring Lemonade. Have a beautiful evening. Thank you for tonight. This is incredible.”

59th Grammy Awards & Lincoln’s Birthday

Alana Massey & Michael Vorenberg

On this week’s  JustLove episode, Monsignor Kevin Sullivan will be speaking with two guests about the 59th Grammy Awards and Lincoln’s Birthday. 

Alana Massey, a writer and essayist, will be talking with  Msgr Sullivan about connections between Pop music/culture and the sacred light in relation to the upcoming 59th Grammy Awards. The Grammys will broadcast this Sunday, February 12th on CBS. She will also talk about her recently published collection of essays:  “All the Lives I Want: Essays about My Best Friends Who Happen to Be Famous Strangers.”

This Sunday is also Abraham Lincoln’s birthday. Michael Vorenberg who is Associate Professor of History at Brown University and a scholar of President Lincoln will be discussing what lessons the Presidency of Abraham Lincoln might have to teach us today with Monsignor Sullivan.

Marching for & Defending the Human Dignity of Others

L-R: Jodi Ziesemer & Kristan Hawkins

On this week’s JustLove episode, Monsignor Kevin Sullivan speaks with two guests about the topic of protecting and preserving human dignity.

On the show, Kristan Hawkins, of President of Students for Life of America will be speaking with Msgr. Sullivan about the work of her organization. Recently, Kristan attended the Women’s March on Washington as well as the 44th Annual “March for Life.” They will be discussing her experiences at both marches.

Also on the show is  Jodi Ziesemer, Supervising Attorney for the Immigrant Children Advocacy and Relief Effort (ICARE) and the Immigration Court Help Desk at Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York.  Msgr. and Jodi will be talking about her experiences this past weekend out at Kennedy Airport in New York City including responding “on the ground” to travelers who were affected by President Trump’s January 27th Executive Order. This order restricts immigration from seven Muslim majority countries, suspends all refugee admissions for 120 days, and bars Syrian refugee admissions indefinitely.

To learn more about the topics covered on this week’s show, visit the following links:

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